From Linda to You

Rebuilding Hope, November 2014 edition
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Linda-Portrait-1_WEBYour response to the border crisis has been truly overwhelming. People like you have supported children and families fleeing violence and persecution in Central America by taking a record number of steps through our action center.

If you haven’t yet taken your own action, visit lirs.org/act to see what you can do as an advocate for families and children in crisis. There are so many ways you can help.

One of the most impactful ways to get involved is to consider becoming a foster parent. The number of unaccompanied minors crossing into our country is staggering. These children need legal advocacy, of course, but they also need a safe place to stay and a loving hand to hold through the process.

Many of you have already contacted us with interest in giving the gift of family to a child who has no one to support and advocate for them. Foster care is no small thing. It takes a willing heart to open your home to a child in need. But, as any foster parent will tell you, it can be one of the most rewarding experiences available to us in this life.

If you’re considering welcoming a child into your family, you can visit lirs.org/fostercare for more information and to see some truly inspiring videos of foster parents and children sharing their stories.

Taking steps to become a foster parent is one of the biggest ways to get involved, but every action you take to advocate for families and children is truly vital in this time of crisis.

A good place to start is to make sure you’re well informed about the situation so that you can spread the word to family and friends, encouraging advocacy in your community, and clearing up all the harmful myths that are going around.

For example, it’s crucial to remember that deportation does not deter people fleeing for their lives. The Obama administration has deported over 400,000 individuals per year, the highest number under any president, yet people continue to seek refuge in the United States.

Similarly, it’s a common misconception that families and children are crossing the border because of poor border security and soft immigration laws. The reason people continue to seek safety in our country is that conditions in their home countries have become unlivable due to gang violence, human trafficking, drug cartels, and other life-threatening problems.

Once we fully understand the desperate situations people face, together we can advocate for solutions in their home countries, as well as their safety and welcome in the United States.

Thank you for continuing to stand beside immigrants and refugees in crisis. Your support is vital in this critical time of need.

Yours in faith, Linda

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